The response of tropical trees to drought is dependent on tree light availability

Functional Ecology: Plain Language Summaries

Lucy Rowland, Antonio da Costa, Rafael Oliveira, Paulo Bittencourt, André Giles, Ingrid Coughlin, David Bartholomew, Tomas Ferreira Domingues, Raquel Miatto, Leandro Ferreira, Steel Vasconcelos, Joao Junior, Alex Oliveira, Maurizio, Mencuccini, Patrick Meir

Looking over the Amazonian tropical rainforest in the National forest of Caxiuanã, north east Brazil.
Looking over the Amazonian tropical rainforest in the National forest of Caxiuanã, north east Brazil.

Tropical rainforests can absorb and store substantial amounts of carbon from the atmosphere, making them vital resources to help us tackle anthropogenic climate change. However, whether tropical forests can maintain their capacity to absorb and store carbon in the future is uncertain and depends on how climate changes influence their function. Climate change projections suggest that tropical forests, particularly those in Amazonia, are likely to be subject to more intense and frequent drought events, alongside long-term declines in soil water availability. Understanding how tropical forests will respond to this drought stress is therefore of substantial interest for predicting future carbon cycle feedbacks between…

View original post 185 more words

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this:
search previous next tag category expand menu location phone mail time cart zoom edit close